North Swedish

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North Swedish Qualities

The North Swedish horses come from Sweden. They have been used for the purposes of pack horses, military purposes, and forestry work alike. They can be found in Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Estonia. The breed is smaller than some of the more powerful breeds, but do not let their size fool you. This style of horse can be very strong, excellent workers.

North Swedish Temperament

The temperament of the North Swedish breed of horses is that of evenness. They are very sweet, willing, and eager to help their owners get to work. Additionally, they can be described as obliging and tender. This style of horses can easily be used for riding purposes for little ones as well.

North Swedish Appearance

The North Swedish horses stand at around fifteen hands at full grown adult size. They have a smaller head, one that is almost fit for a pony. A crested neck, sloping shoulders, deeper body frame, and very rounded quarters, the breed also has a low set tail and a sweeping quarter. They have solid, round feet. They also have a low wither and a deep chest as well.

North Swedish Upkeep

The North Swedish breed is considered simple to care for. They are basic creatures that are fun loving, easy going, and strong. The breed can reside in either cold or warm climates with ease. This style of horse does not need to be observed carefully most days as they can easily care for themselves and do not need to have much attention from their owners. They do enjoy playing and will desire roaming around for hours.

North Swedish History

The North Swedish horses were bred from Sweden. They are a draft breed developed from the Scandinavian ones. They are not the traditional size of those horses, but they are very clean, neat, and have a small body frame ideal for working in the forests and lumber yards. This breed is remarkably powerful for their smaller size as they can perform tasks that larger horses would do with an attitude. They are noted as one of the top breeds tested for every possible element as far as horse breeds go, and they also have to pass some very strict policies and rules just to get into the breed standard studbook. That studbook was opened sometime in 1909 and they are so detailed with their book regulations that they actually scan the horse to ensure they are what they need to be to get into the book.

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