Knabstrup

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Knabstrup Qualities

Qualities of a Knabstrup horse are that they are strong and resilient. Many are thought of as very strong and also rather sound creatures. Intelligent and also considered gentle, these animals are distinctive looking and generally quite pleasant as well. While they are noted for being such rugged horses, they are equally as gentle. They can be found in Denmark, Germany, Sweden, and around many seas, such as the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. They are also bred in the United Kingdom, the United States, and Italy. The ones that have spotted coats are a result of something called the Leopard Complex, which is what makes these animals so popular. This particular breed is one of the warmer blood lines.

Knabstrup Temperament

The Knabstrup horses are overall pretty happy horses. They are generally very eager to be trained and are considered willing creatures. Gentle and loving, they still bode the ability to be extremely strong when they need to be.

Knabstrup Appearance

The Knabstrup horses are tall, somewhere around sixteen hands in adult size. They are large in height and smaller in total size for a full grown size, but they are incredibly strong. A rather tiny head for their size, they also bode great feet and have a lot of muscle tissue in their frames. Their spotted coats and one-of-a-kind patterns can aide them in being a very simple breed to pick out of a crowd.

Knabstrup Upkeep

The Knabstrup horse is easy to care for. They are one of the breeds that are willing to train when they are young. These horses are not noted to bode any major illnesses, which makes owning them a simple task.

Knabstrup History

Coming from Denmark, the Knabstrup breed was developed from a Spanish cavalry mare to evolve into a popular Danish breed. Some experts believe this breed began sometime during the invasion led by Napoleon and that one of the horses was somehow left behind. That single horse, brought by a man named Flaebe, a butcher, started a new desire for this breed to be developed even further. That horse was white and had a few brown spots. Someone that owned an estate named the horses Knabstrup and they were also referred to as 'Knabstruper'. Inside the Frederiksborg stallions became a Knabstrup and from there the horse was able to lend a few of their notable traits to the new breed. They were created with that unique sense of color and spots on their coats, and their adoring personalities were just a plus. If you have ever spotted an American Appaloosa, then you've seen the only other variation that comes close to being mistaken as a Knabstrup.

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